Lesson Planning

The five components I selected for my lesson planning assignment are:

  1. Bloom’s Taxonomy (IT IS FOUNDATIONAL)
  2. Characteristics of Adult Learners (TO UNDERSTAND THEIR NEEDS)
  3. Creating a Positive Learning Environment (ENCOURAGEMENT AND RESPECT HELP OVERCOME NEGATIVE OUTCOMES)
  4. Motivational Techniques (I SPECIALIZE IN ENCOURAGING OTHERS)
  5. Media (IMPORTANT TO SELECT RIGHT MEDIA AND PROGRAMS)

Each component title has a subtitle that describes why I choose this topic.  I also included a helpful link at the end of each component summary and a reference section to aid further research.

In my March 20, post titled Technical Issues, I mentioned the free WordPress theme I choose, does not seem to support APA format.   To check APA compliance please activate this link APA Format – Lesson Planning

1. Bloom’s Taxonomy (BECAUSE IT IS FOUNDATIOINAL)

Blooms action & Media.gif

Benjamin Bloom’s taxonomy (1956) classifies learning objectives in three domains: Cognitive (Head), Psychomotor (Hand), and Affective (Heart).  Bloom’s colleagues (Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001) revised his work using action words as descriptors. “Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy” (Churches 2009) added the new domain of Internet collaboration.   In future course planning, I will consider which domain and actions best help my students reach their stated goals.  Where appropriate, I prefer to teach in the heart domain, using digital collaboration tools to strengthen positive change.  The course design should move my clients towards the higher order thinking skills of evaluating and creating.

https://edorigami.wikispaces.com/file/view/bloom’s+Digital+taxonomy+v3.01.pdf

2. Characteristics of Adult Learners (TO UNDERSTAND THEIR NEEDS)

Malcolm S. Knowles (1980, 1990) emphasizes that adult learners are self-directed and expect to take responsibility for their decisions.  They tend to be focused on solving problems, are results-oriented, and want to immediately apply what they learn.  My lesson plans will focus on collaborating with these learners to identify their issues and help guide them to tools that can give quick, valuable solutions. Although students might not agree with my course plan, we can work together to make adjustments to shape the curriculum.  I will provide opportunities for dialogue among students, to help draw from their collective, practical knowledge.

http://www.rit.edu/academicaffairs/tls/characteristics-adult-learners

3. Creating a Positive Learning Environment (ENCOURAGEMENT AND RESPECT HELP OVERCOME NEGATIVE OUTCOMES)

U of D Learning

The University of Delaware handbook titled, The Positive Classroom Climate encourages instructors to: recognize individual differences, learn names,establish expectations, make yourself available, and encourage the students.  I will incorporate a variety of teaching approaches for the subject matter.  By asking students to suggest new methods of learning material, it would give a voice to their own experience and learning styles.  This hand book discusses many practical tips for remembering names, managing the classroom, and dealing with incivility.  I will investigate this and other similar resources to keep improving a positive, productive, encouraging and respectful learning environment.

http://cte.udel.edu/publications/handbook-graduate-assistants/getting-started/positive-classroom-climate.html

4. Motivational Techniques (I SPECIALIZE IN ENCOURAGING OTHERS)  

motivate   CLRT

Raymond Wlodkowski (1985) said, “When adults are motivated to learn, they work harder, learn more, have a sense of enjoyment and achievement, and want to continue learning”.  He says the five pillars that instructors should offer adults are: expertise, empathy, enthusiasm, clarity, and cultural responsiveness. The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching  is an excellent resource, listing motivation research projects throughout North America’s top Universities.  Digging deeper into the sections on “A Model of Intrinsic Motivation” and “Strategies for Motivating Students”, will help strengthen my personal five pillars and assist in future construction of my lesson plans.

http://www.crlt.umich.edu/tstrategies/tsms

5. Media (IMPORTANT TO SELECT RIGHT MEDIA AND PROGRAMS)

Selecting Media Taxonomy with Media

Non-Projected Media includes flipcharts, chalk and white boards, handouts, photos and real objects.  Their main advantages are being simple to use and not requiring electrical power.  Projected Media (PM) requires power, but can bring diverse, rich and up to the minute content to learners.    PM involves Audio, DVD, Video, software programs and websites. These include PowerPoint, WebCT, Moodle, Infographics, Wiki, Blogs, YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.  I plan to instruct the learners to use critical thinking to determine content biases.  They should also find opposing views to create balanced thought provoking discussions that use Bloom’s “Higher Order Thinking Skills”.

http://intranet.umanitoba.ca/academic_support/catl/media/5_lr_UTShandbook.pdf

References

Anderson, L. W., & Krathwohl, D. R. (eds.) (2001).  A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman.

Bloom, B. S.; Engelhart, M. D.; Furst, E. J.; Hill, W. H.; Krathwohl, D. R. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. Handbook I: Cognitive domain. New York: David McKay Company.

Churches, A., (2009). Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy.  Retrieved March 25, 2014 fromhttps://edorigami.wikispaces.com/file/view/bloom’s+Digital+taxonomy+v3.01.pdf

Friesen, E., Kristjanson, C.(Eds.). (2007). Teaching at the University of Manitoba – A Handbook.  Winnipeg, Manitoba: University Teaching Services Retrieved March 29, 2014 http://intranet.umanitoba.ca/academic_support/catl/media/5_lr_UTShandbook.pdf

Knowles, M. S. (1973). The adult learner: A neglected species. Houston: Gulf Publishing Company. Revised Edition 1990.

Knowles, M. S. (1980). The modern practice of adult education: From pedagogy to andragogy. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall/Cambridge

Positive Classroom Climate (2014) Retrieved March 28, 2014 from http://cte.udel.edu/publications/handbook-graduate-assistants/getting-started/positive-classroom-climate.html

Wlodkowski, R. J. (1985). Enhancing adult motivation to learn: a comprehensive guide for teaching all adults (p. inside flap). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Wlodkowski, R. J. (2008). Enhancing Adult Motivation to Learn: A Comprehensive Guide for Teaching All Adults (3rd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

 

 

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